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December 30, 2015
by Jerry DiPaola


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Military Bowl loss to Navy sends Pitt into the off-season

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Pitt’s off-season began Monday night in the wake of another disappointing loss in a bowl game.
Pitt is 1-4 in bowls since hiring Todd Graham in 2011, and the four losses are among the worst in recent school history:
The first two following the ’11 and ’12 seasons were lost by teams that weren’t especially interested in postseason practices or games, were defeated by 22 and 21 points by SMU and Ole Miss, respectively, and finished with a losing record (6-7).
The other two were embarrassing and discouraging, respectively. Pitt lost 31-6 and 34-13 fourth-quarter leads to Houston last year. This season, the Panthers couldn’t stop (actually, they couldn’t even slow down) Navy’s triple option, losing, 44-28, in the Military Bowl. It was the most points Pitt allowed in a bowl game in 86 years, even though everyone seemed confident prior to the game.
Funny thing about those four losses — only one was delivered by a Power 5 school.
The 8-5 record is better than anything Graham or Paul Chryst directed, so that’s progress (never mind that Pitt was 6-1 and 8-3 this season before the grand fall).
All will be forgiven if Pat Narduzzi, who has already attracted a good 19-man recruiting class, can put the finishing touch on it by getting a commitment from Central Catholic defensive back Damar Hamlin.
If Hamlin signs with Pitt, it won’t matter to most fans if Woodland Hills running back Miles Sanders goes to Penn State. Sanders has been committed to the Nittany Lions for nearly 18 months. Will one more month change his mind?
While you’re waiting for all that, plus Tyler Boyd’s decision and the name of the next offensive coordinator, check out our College Football Locker Room show from Wednesday on TribLive Radio. I flew solo, with Bob Cohn in Jacksonville for the Taxslayer Bowl and Bill West and his wife welcoming their first born into the world.
Hard to believe, but there are some things more important than college football.

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December 27, 2015
by Jerry DiPaola


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Military Bowl notes, quotes and anecdotes

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ANNAPOLIS, Md. — Here’s what I’ve learned the past few days while Pitt prepared to meet Navy on Monday in the Military Bowl.
— Navy players aren’t especially happy about having to play a bowl game on their home field — Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis, Md. — while their American Athletic Conference brethren went to places such Miami Beach, Fla., Boca Raton, Fla., and Hawaii.
— I now can spell Navy coach Ken Niumatalolo’s name without looking it up.
— The Pitt’s coach’s name is actually pronounced Nar-Dut-Chee (at least, among his Italian relatives and friends).
Other than that, I haven’t learned enough to back off my original prediction that Pitt can beat the No. 21 Midshipmen. I believe Tyler Boyd — participating in an unofficial NFL audition — will have a big game against Navy’s secondary that allowed Army’s Edgar Allan Poe (yes, that’s his name) five receptions for 121 yards and a touchdown.
Pitt 24, Navy 21 (the opposite of Navy’s victory against the Panthers in 2013).

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Pitt will display a big, blue Conner Strong banner outside the stadium Monday and is inviting people to sign it in support of running back James Conner, who is battling Hodgkins lymphoma. The banner will be next to Gate 6 (550 Taylor Avenue) of the parking lot on the Gold side of the field from 9:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m.
The banner also will be held up as Pitt runs onto the field before the game, and officials are asking people to chant “Conner Strong.”

No matter who gets the permanent job as Pitt’s offensive coordinator, the interim guy says he’ll be back next season. “Unless my wife has me moving somewhere else,” Tim Salem said.
The Military Bowl also is an audition for Salem, the former tight ends coach who is a candidate for the permanent job when Narduzzi starts his search in earnest next month.
Asked if he plans any changes for the game, Salem said, “Bring your seat belt.”
“You get bored and stale from playing a football season,” he said, “but you give (the players) something new.”
Within reason, of course. “We’re not idiots that we can go out and run the Wishbone and match Navy,” he said.
The idea is to win, whether that involves “razzle-dazzle plays … or 10 quarterback sneaks in a row,” he said.
Narduzzi said he will keep a closer eye on the offense “just because it’s new. Be a little more focused on the game clock. The game’s too critical.”

Pitt and Navy have met 39 times, with the Panthers holding a 22-14-3 edge. The teams met in all but three seasons from 1961-1989, perhaps none more memorable than Oct. 26, 1963.
Navy won, 24-12, behind Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback Roger Staubach . Pitt was led by two-way All-America lineman Ernie Borghetti, whose son E.J. is now the school’s executive associate athletic director/media relations and one of the most loyal Pitt men you’ll ever meet.
Pitt finished 9-1 that season, but it was not invited to a bowl because the Orange Bowl was fearful the Panthers would lose to Penn State two weeks later. Pitt/PSU was postponed by the JFK assassination.
Pitt won, 22-21, but it was too late. Navy (9-2) went on to play for the national championship in the Cotton Bowl, but lost to Texas, 28-6.
One more note from 1963 that may be interesting only to me: CBS introduced instant replay to the nation in the Army-Navy game Dec. 7, a contest Kennedy, a Navy man, was scheduled to attend.
When Army quarterback Rollie Stichweh scored on a 1-yard plunge late in the game, CBS replayed it and viewers were confused. They ended up flooding the CBS switchboard, thinking they had seen Army score twice, according to Michael Connelly’s book “The President’s Team: The 1963 Army-Navy Game and the Assassination of JFK.”
Legendary play-by-play man Lindsey Nelson assured everyone it was only a replay, and an invention we cannot live without today was born.

A couple of quick notes: Pitt wide receiver Zach Challingsworth, who had become a receiving alternative to Boyd late in the season, hurt his shoulder against Miami last month and won’t play against Navy. Challingsworth, a sophomore from South Fayette, had recent surgery. … Pitt hasn’t defeated a ranked opponent since knocking off No. 24/25 Notre Dame in 2013.

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December 16, 2015
by Jerry DiPaola


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Cornerback from Florida could be Pitt’s 17th verbal

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When I called Gateway (Fla.) High School coach Marlin Roberts on Wednesday, I asked him what three-star prospect Henry Miller brought to his team this season.
“He brings so much,” Roberts said. “I don’t know where to start.”
Miller has narrowed his college choices to Pitt and N.C. State and will announce his choice 7 p.m. Friday via Twitter, Roberts said.
Miller played quarterback and cornerback for Gateway, a school in Kissimmee, Fla., that plays in the state’s largest classification (8A). He passed for 935 yards and 12 touchdowns, ran for 974 and 16 and only threw two interceptions while leading Gateway (7-4) to its first playoff appearance in school history.
He also intercepted three passes, even though Roberts counted opposing teams throwing his way only 10 times all season. At 6-foot-3, 193 pounds, he projects as a cornerback, which (if he actually plays that position in college) will make some secondary coach very happy. Roberts said Miller has been timed in 4.47 seconds in the 40-yard dash and is a sprinter on the track team. He played basketball, but gave it up this season to concentrate on his recruitment.
Roberts said N.C. State has been on Miller “pretty hard.” In fact, one of its coaches called Roberts immediately before I did Wednesday morning. Meanwhile, Pitt tight ends coach Tim Salem “comes down here all the time,” Roberts said.
Miller also has drawn offers from Kentucky, Louisville, Michigan State, Mississippi State, Oregon State, Rutgers, West Virginia and Wisconsin. Strangely, none of the Florida schools have offered. Florida had interest, “but they weren’t on him as much as Pitt,” Roberts said.
Here are a few facts about Pitt’s Class of 2016:
— Pitt has 17 verbal commitments, including five (all out-of-state) in the past month. The breakdown is WPIAL and City League (five), Ohio (four), New Jersey/New York (four, including two who had previously committed to Rutgers), Virginia (two), Florida (one) and North Carolina (one).
— Rivals.com ranks Pitt’s class 47th in the nation, ninth in the ACC. So, coach Pat Narduzzi clearly has a lot more work to do, this year and beyond.
— One gem no one has talked much about is tight end Chris Clark, a former 5-star from New Jersey, who is transferring from UCLA.
— Only two Pitt verbals — Lima, Ohio, wide receiver Ruben Flowers and Aliquippa linebacker Kaezon Pugh – are rated four-stars by Rivals.
— Pugh and Central Catholic stars Bricen Garner and Rashad Wheeler are playing in state championship games Saturday.
— Three recruits are enrolling in January and will be eligible to participate in spring drills: Clark, running back Chawntez Moss and defensive end Patrick Jones.
Because he is transferring, Clark may have to sit out until 2017. Moss will compete for playing time with ACC Rookie of the Year Qadree Ollison, freshman Darrin Hall and junior James Conner, who is battling Hodgkins lymphoma and hopes to play next season. A hole opened up at running back when sophomore Chris James said he plans to transfer.
Jones steps in behind veterans Shakir Soto, Rori Blair and two promising transfer ends who didn’t play this season: Dewayne Hendrix and Allen Edwards. Plus, oft-injured senior Ejuan Price, a first-team All-ACC performer this season, might petition the NCAA for a sixth season.
For more on recruiting and Pitt, Penn State and West Virginia bowl preparations, click here on the College Football Locker Room show on TribLive Radio, with Penn State writer Bob Cohn, West Virginia writer Bill West and myself.

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December 7, 2015
by Jerry DiPaola


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Pitt’s bowl situation is a matter of economics

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A few thoughts on Pitt’s bowl destination:
Yes, it’s true that Pitt (8-4) is better than Louisville, N.C. State and Duke — teams that were awarded ACC Tier One bowl berths while Pitt is going to the Tier Two Military Bowl to play Navy on a Monday afternoon in Annapolis, Md.
But Louisville is going to the Music City Bowl in Nashville, Tenn., and N.C. State to the Belk in Charlotte, N.C., strictly for geographic reasons. In other words, their fans will buy more tickets and spend more money in the host cities than Pitt fans would have done.
Duke to the Pinstripe Bowl in NYC? Pitt wanted that trip, but Duke fans travel better. That’s one of the sad realities of the bowl season. The bowls are the hosts, and they have the right to pick their guests.
Unfair? Depends on your perspective.
What’s more attractive? Playing 6-6 Indiana on the day (Saturday) after Christmas in Yankee Stadium? (Actually, other than opponent, the idea of Christmas in New York and a football game in a legendary baseball venue is kind of cool.)
Or playing a 9-2 (non-Power 5) Navy team with a Heisman Trophy candidate (Keenan Reynolds) at quarterback? I’ve been to Annapolis. There’s nothing quite like the scene when the Midshipmen march into the Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in lockstep.
Both games are nationally televised, by the way.
Don’t be naïve enough to think that victories don’t matter. If Pitt had defeated Miami in the final regular-season game, the Panthers would have had two more victories than those three ACC rivals — and conference rules would have prevented them from leapfrogging Pitt.
One more note: None of the four ACC teams that are playing in Tier One Bowls are matched against ranked opponents. Navy is No. 21.
Here’s a solution for Pitt fans to consider: Go to the game. I bet you never thought of that.
If enough of you show up, the bowls will notice and you may not have this problem next year.

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December 5, 2015
by Jerry DiPaola


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Miami coach Mark Richt’s fling with Pitt

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I never thought new Miami coach Mark Richt would reference Pitt at his introductory news conference Friday, but he did tell an interesting tale — albeit, one that’s 19 years old.
Richt said he turned down an opportunity to replace Johnny Majors as Pitt’s head coach in 1996 because he wanted to go to a place where he could spend the rest of his career.
That was a time when Pitt was coming off five consecutive losing seasons while playing in 71-year-old Pitt Stadium that was torn down three years later.
“When I was offered the job at the University of Pittsburgh five years prior to taking Georgia job, it wasn’t official that I was hired,” Richt said, “but at the end of the visit, the AD (Steve Pederson) said, ‘If you spend the night, I’ll introduce you to the fans at the basketball game as our new head coach.’ ”
Richt, who at the time was offensive coordinator at Florida State, assumed that was a job offer, so he consulted with his wife Katharyn.
“I talked to Katharyn and said, ‘Do you want to live in Pittsburgh for the rest of your life?’ I have nothing against Pittsburgh. I love Pittsburgh. I love the Iron City … but I said, ‘Is this where you want to live, for good?’
“She said, ‘Why do you ask?’
“I said, ‘Because I don’t want to take a job knowing I’m looking for another job.’ ”
Richt, 55, said it was important for him not to take a job that was a steppingstone to something else. (Refreshing, right?)
“I can see assistant coaches moving,” he said, “but when you’re the head coach, everything rises and falls on you and so many people are counting on you.
“What I didn’t want to do was go to Pittsburgh or anywhere else and then, three years down the road, say, ‘I got a better job. I got a better opportunity. I’ll see you all later. Thanks for helping me get to where I want to be.’
“If we were going to become head coach, I want it to be at a place where I feel like I could finish my career. That’s how we felt about Georgia at the time, and that’s exactly how we feel about the University of Miami.”
Richt turned down Pitt and stayed at Florida State until he was hired at Georgia in 2001. He stayed there until he was fired last week, compiling a 145-51 record with two SEC championships in 15 seasons.
Pitt hired Walt Harris, the one and only coach to lead the Panthers to a major bowl in the past three decades.

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December 5, 2015
by Jerry DiPaola


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Pitt’s Conner set for the fight of his life

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When we got the word from James Conner himself, maybe some people should have felt a little foolish.
Pitt called an early-afternoon news conference Friday, and the release from the good people in Sports Information said it would involve Conner, Pitt’s star running back who is sitting out this season with a knee injury.
Some thought it was called so Conner could announce he was going to the NFL. Those who believed that don’t know Conner very well. No way would Conner deflect attention from his buddies by shining light on himself. There isn’t a better teammate in that locker room.
No, Conner announced that he is returning to Pitt, but he will be in the fight of — and for — his life for most of 2016. It was only last Thursday — Thanksgiving morning –that Conner and his family met with Dr. Stanley Marks, chairman of the UPMC Cancer Center, who delivered the news:
Conner has Hodgkins lymphoma.
See, a little more important than the makeup of the NFL Draft.
Conner vowed to fight the disease.
“When it’s all said and done, we are going to have quite a story to tell. Can’t wait to tell it,” he said, promising to someday run out of the tunnel at Heinz Field with his Pitt teammates.
Marks, one of the world’s leading authorities on cancer and its treatment, is confident Conner can win this battle. Chemotherapy will be tough and long — at least six-months long — but Hodgkins is highly curable, with chemotherapy having a 85-95 percent success rate, according to Marks.
Conner is in good hands — Marks has been helping and counseling cancer and leukemia patients for decades. Believe me, I know.
The best hands, though, belong to Conner, who will do whatever it takes to resurrect his football career. Even if he must miss the better part of two seasons.
By the way, nice touch from coaches Dabo Swinney and Larry Fedora of Clemson and North Carolina, who offered these get-well wishes to Conner the day before their teams are scheduled to meet in Charlotte, N.C., in the ACC Championship game.
For more on Conner’s story, check out “The Kevin Gorman Show” on Triblive Radio. Thanks to Kevin for inviting me to participate.

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December 3, 2015
by Jerry DiPaola


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Post-season honors may signal bright future at Pitt

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The victories against Duke and Louisville were nice, but the best two days of the past month for the Pitt football program were Monday and Tuesday when the future came into a sudden and bright focus.
Even if it doesn’t include James Conner and Tyler Boyd.
Let’s be clear, though. Conner and Boyd are two of the best players to wear a Pitt uniform — ever — and they would make the Panthers as strong as any team in the ACC next season. A tie for second place wasn’t bad for a first-year coach, but with Conner and Boyd, fans rightfully would expect a division championship, at least.
But the program is no longer top heavy with one or two stars; good players are developing throughout the roster.
Eight Pitt players were recognized by the ACC, which probably goes overboard naming first-, second-, third- and honorable mention teams. Still, those players caught the eyes of several observers and analysts in the media during the season, and the best part of the story for Pitt is that at least five of them are returning.
Let’s deal with the first-team selections first.
Boyd, a junior, and senior defensive end Ejuan Price could return in 2016 — if that’s what they want.
Boyd, however, could declare for the NFL Draft and become at least a second-round pick in the spring. That reality will be difficult for him to ignore.
Could Boyd improve his standing if he comes back to Pitt for his senior year? Probably. He won’t have a new quarterback to connect with or a new offense to learn next year, and he could compile even greater pass-catching numbers than his 85/873/6 (receptions/yards/touchdowns) of 2015.
But you can’t do dramatically better than the second round, unless you get into the top 10 of the first round, so Boyd may opt to leave.
Price is another story. Pitt coach Pat Narduzzi wants him to return and said he would personally file papers with the NCAA to get Price a sixth year of eligibility after injuries wiped out more than half of his college career.
But Price also will be eligible for the 2016 draft. I think he could help his 2017 draft position if he returns to school, but that’s something for Price and his family to decide.
Five of the remaining six Pitt ACC all-stars (senior defensive tackle Darryl Render) is the exception) will return next season.
Second-teamers Adam Bisnowaty and Dorian Johnson, both juniors, quietly had good seasons while anchoring the left side of Pitt’s offensive line. Running back Qadree Ollison, a redshirt freshman, was named ACC Offensive Rookie of the Year and also took his place on the second team.
On defense, strong safety Jordan Whitehead was overall and defensive Rookie of the Year and a third-team All-ACC safety. Sophomore Avonte Maddox checked in as an honorable mention cornerback.
That’s a good foundation from which to build the 2016 Pitt team. Several other key players are back next year, including quarterback Nathan Peterman, running back Darrin Hall, starting offensive linemen Alex Officer and Brian O’Neill, promising backup O-lineman Alex Bookser, several defensive backs (other than Whitehead) and linebackers Matt Galambos, Mike Caprara and Bam Bradley.
But that’s a story for the spring. This season still has a game to go, and Pitt’s bowl destination will be announced Sunday. Pitt has a second chance to get to nine victories for the first time since 2009 (when it won 10).
I’m rooting for Nashville and the Music City Bowl on Dec. 30 (vs. Tennessee?), but New York City, Yankee Stadium and the Pinstripe Bowl on Dec. 26 (vs. Indiana?) seem more likely. I hear some Pitt band members have been told to prepare to spend Christmas on Broadway.
For a complete wrap-up of the Pitt, Penn State and West Virginia regular seasons, give a click and a listen to the College Football Locker Room show. It aired on TribLive Radio on Wednesday, but you can get it here, too. It features the Trib’s three college beat writers (myself, Bob Cohn and Bill West).
I hope it comes across, but it’s my most enjoyable hour of the work week.

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November 26, 2015
by Jerry DiPaola


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Happy Thanksgiving, and here’s one last bread crumb for the season: A Miami/Pitt prediction

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It’s Thanksgiving Day, and the Pitt players and coaches — at some point during the day — will check into a hotel for their weekly day-before-the-game meetings, dinner (turkey and stuffing, I hope) and lights-out well before midnight.
It’s one of the prices college and pro athletes pay. A holiday is just another day.
Kickoff for the final regular-season game is noon Friday, with ESPN2 doing the TV honors and former Pitt quarterback John Congemi providing the analysis.
I thought Louisville would be Pitt’s toughest opponent other than Iowa, North Carolina and Notre Dame, but Pitt dominated a good portion of that game.
Miami, with quarterback Brad Kaaya throwing the football from one sideline to the other (often down the field), might be better than Louisville. Perhaps the game will be decided on how well Pitt cornerbacks Lafayette Pitts and Avonte Maddox play.
Look for another fierce Pitt pass rush, but a close game — 38-35, Pitt. Keep your foot warm and dry, Chris Blewitt.

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November 20, 2015
by Jerry DiPaola


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One year’s time makes a big difference for Pitt

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A year ago, Pitt was 4-6, a loser of six of eight games and (even though no one knew at the time) less than a month from another coach search — its third in four years.
To the players’ credit, Pitt beat Syracuse and Miami to become bowl eligible, but the Orange and ‘Canes hardly seemed interested. Paul Chryst certainly wasn’t interested in finishing what he started when he was lured by the chance to coach his alma mater, Wisconsin.
With two games left in this season, Pitt is 7-3, with an athletic director who actually listens to his head coach and a head coach whose commitment to the university is the strongest of anyone in his position since the final days of Dave Wannstedt.
The other difference, however, is Saturday’s opponent, Louisville, won’t be subdued easily, even though it might only be the fourth-best team on Pitt’s schedule.
The Cardinals are athletic on defense, and their offense is functionally well, with Kyle Bolin at quarterback and Brandon Radcliff at running back. Slow down those two to a significant extent and Pitt will win.
Pitt has a lot at stake, most notably a chance to win nine games by beating Louisville on Saturday and Miami next Friday. Pitt hasn’t taken nine victories into its bowl game since 2009.
Even though it’s a longshot, Pitt still has a chance to win the ACC Coastal Division, but North Carolina must lose two while Pitt is winning two. The Tar Heels are on the road for both games, starting with Virginia Tech on Saturday in Hokies coach Frank Beamer’s last home game before retirement.
I expect a close game at Heinz Field, but Louisville will extend its winning streak to five in a row (seven of eight), 27-23.
Feel free to disagree.
I don’t think a loss to Louisville will affect Pitt’s bowl berth greatly, unless the Panthers also lose next week to Miami. If so, perhaps it’s hello (again), Birmingham. Yes, the Birmingham Bowl — no longer sponsored by BBVA –is on the long list of bowls with ties to the ACC.
As it stands now, Clemson will play in the College Football Playoff semifinal, if it wins the ACC Championship game (maybe even if it doesn’t).
Florida State or North Carolina would go to the Russell Athletic. That leaves the Sun, Belk, Pinstripe, Music City and Taxslayer to juggle FSU or UNC, Pitt, Louisville, N.C. State, Miami, Duke and Virginia Tech (assuming the five-victory Hokies reach bowl eligibility).
It will be interesting to see which bowls send representatives to Heinz Field on Saturday.

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November 14, 2015
by Jerry DiPaola


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Saturday in Durham represents defining moment for Pitt

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Game day in Durham, N.C., and the sun is shining on refurbished Wallace Wade Stadium.
Before boarding a flight Friday, I spent 10 minutes with Stan Savran on WBGG/ESPN Radio.
Stan, an all-time great Pittsburgh media member and one of the most astute observers of this area’s sports scene for about four decades, made a good point during our chat: Pitt’s game against Duke is a defining moment in coach Pat Narduzzi’s first season.
Win, and Pitt (6-3, 4-1) has a chance to turn this season into something special by coming home and playing two mediocre (overall record-wise) teams Louisville and Miami. How does 8-4 sound, Pitt fans, after four consecutive 6-6s?
Lose, and Pitt extends its losing streak to three and is confronted with trying to save the season from falling into the miserable ennui that infested the past four seasons.
By the way, I looked up the word ennui (heard it once in a Frank Sinatra song): “A feeling of listlessness and dissatisfaction arising from a lack of occupation or excitement.”
Does that describe the attitude of Pitt fans — and some players — during bowl season 2011-2014?
I think so.
Prediction: Pitt 31, Duke 28.

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