Romeo and Juliet, Jorge and Amalia

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Well, that didn’t take long.

The media in Buenos Aires have tracked down a woman who says she’s the long lost love of Pope Francis. Amalia, who has only been identified by her first name, still gets emotional when she talks about the boy in her neighborhood, Jorge Mario Bergoglio, even though their romance was, she acknowledges, “just a little thing.”

It was their parents who kept the star-crossed “lovers” apart. The desperate Jorge wrote Amalia a letter, proposing marriage. “If I can’t marry you, I’ll become a priest,” Amalia recalls Jorge as saying. Fearing the wrath of her father, she did not reply.

They were 12.

“I have nothing to hide, as it was a thing between children and totally pure,” Amalia said.

Jorge, by the way, did not immediately get himself to a seminary. He only decided to become a priest when he was 21. But if Amalia can be believed, perhaps he’d been contemplating the religious life for a while.

 

h/t The Telegraph

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Viva il Papa, the subway rider

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In 2008, then-Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio (second from left) rides the subway in Buenos Aires, Argentina. "Padre Jorge" was known for taking public transport while archbishop. — AP | Pablo Leguizamon

In 2008, then-Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio (second from left) rides the subway in Buenos Aires, Argentina. “Padre Jorge” was known for taking public transport while archbishop. — AP | Pablo Leguizamon

 

Eight years ago, the elevation of the German cardinal, Joseph Ratzinger, to the papacy was met with derision by both serious and frivolous British papers. “God’s Rottweiler,” blared the front page of the Daily Telegraph. It’s not often that the liberal Guardian falls into line with the sassy but conservative Sun, but on Pope Benedict they agreed: “From Hitler youth to the Vatican,” said  The Guardian. “From Hitler Youth to… Papa Ratzi,” screamed The Sun.

Newspaper editors reflect their environment and know their readers.  In 2005, the blitzed British had a knee-jerk — i.e., a Basil-Fawlty-like goose-step — reaction to a German pope.

Maybe it’s impossible to make fun of Francis, the Argentine Jesuit who passed on the perks that came with being a cardinal — the chauffeur-driven car, the palace, the chef. Continue reading

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‘We’ve lost our way’

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Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

That’s Jeb Bush on where the Republican Party is at the moment. While flogging his new book on immigration on NBC’s “Today Show,” the easygoing former governor of Florida covered several topics including:

  • He doesn’t rule out more revenue in a budget deal despite “the biggest tax increase in American history”: “There may be (room for revenue) if the president is sincere about dealing with our structural problems.”
  • He “loves” Chris Christie, and was “a little surprised” that the New Jersey gov wasn’t invited to CPAC.
  • Does his book, media appearances signal he’s running in 2016? He’s not ruling it out. “I want to share my beliefs about how the conservative movement and Republican Party can regain its footing, because we’ve lost our way.”

If you ask me, Jeb’s running.

 

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

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They do drone on

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MILITARY-TVTECHNOLOGY

Photo: Rick Loomis | Los Angeles Times

Sen. Rand Paul may have gotten a few more arrows for his quiver on Friday courtesy of the Freedom of Information Act as the Kentucky Republican aims to find out whether the Obama administration would justify the killing of an American terrorist on U.S. soil.

The Senate Select Committee on Intelligence is scheduled to vote on John Brennan’s nomination to be CIA director on Tuesday, The Hill reported. But Paul, for one, is still anxious for answers from the White House on its drone program, he told the National Journal in an interview published on Saturday, and so he may put a hold on the process.

Paul, it turns out, is one of a bipartisan gang of four senators who intend to keep droning on about the unmanned aircraft  Continue reading

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