Chart: The most trusted name in news?

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new Brookings and Public Religion Research Institute survey on What Americans Want From Immigration Reform contains some interesting data on what TV news channels are considered most trusted by party affiliation. If you’re an MSNBC fan, better avert your eyes … Continue reading

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On top of the world: A panorama from the new WTC

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TimeTopOfAmericaPhotograph by Jonathan D. Woods and Michael Franz for Time magazine; stitching: Gavin D. Farrell; compositing: Meghan P. Farrell; color: Claudio Palmisano/10b

Acrophobics look away.

Time magazine has gone to the top of the steel-and-glass symbol of freedom — the 1,776-foot high 1 World Trade Center — to make an interactive 360-degree image.

“You can see the whole world up there,” says Jonathan D. Woods, Time’s senior editor for photography and interactive.

How did they do it?

“An eight-month process of design and construction resulted in a 13-ft.-long aluminum jib calibrated to adhere to the base of the beacon at the top of the tower’s 408-ft. spire,” according to Richard Lacayo in Time.  “To that rotating arm was attached a Canon 5D Mark II with a 100-mm lens. Over a five-hour span of orbital shooting on Sept. 28, 2013, the camera produced 567 pictures that were then stitched together digitally into a single massive—and zoomable—image of everything the eye can see in all directions.”

You can play with the panorama here.

Read Time’s article on The Top of America here.

Watch a video  of how they took the picture here.

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A forgotten battle: 70th anniversary of Eniwetok

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Photo by George Strock | Courtesy of Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

Photo by George Strock | Courtesy of Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

On Feb. 17, 1944, the U.S. assault on a now-forgotten atoll in the Pacific begins. The battle for Eniwetok, a small northwest point of the Marshall Islands, forms part of the island-hopping strategy to overtake Japan. It’s north of Guadalcanal, won a year earlier, and due east of Guam, which would be retaken five months later.

Tiny Engebi island is key because it holds a Japanese airstrip that allows the enemy to refuel. After U.S. gunships pound the terrain, 15 Marines with the 22nd regiment and one photographer with Life magazine are the first ashore. George Strock is “actually … on the beach taking pictures of the initial assault and greeting the landing troops” as they arrive, reports Marine First Lt. John M. Popham of Brooklyn, a public relations officer. Continue reading

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