‘Manna from heaven': Magic Last Supper papyrus found in England

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papyrusIn 6th century Egypt, not far from the Nile, a Christian wrote special biblical passages in Greek on the back of a tax receipt.

The fragment of papyrus drifted into obscurity and since 1901 has languished in vaults deep inside a library in England.

But now, it’s found the light. Continue reading

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Jesus said to them, ‘My wife…’

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US Scholar Jesus WifeA piece of papyrus with the words “Jesus said to them, my wife” has been dated to the 6th to 9th centuries, Harvard Divinity School reports.

The small fragment — a mere 1 1/2 inches by 3 inches — caused a storm of criticism in 2012 when Karen L. King, a professor at the school, announced its existence in 2012. The origin and author of the papyrus remains a mystery. All we know is a collector, who owned the papyrus and wishes to remain anonymous, had asked for King’s help in finding out more about it. Continue reading

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Christian tattoo found on Nile mummy

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A photograph (left) and an infra-red reflectography of a tattoo found on the mummified remains of a Sudanese woman. | Photo courtesy of the British Museum.

The British Museum has used CAT scans to examine eight Egyptian-era mummies, one of whom was a woman who died about AD 700. But researchers were able to discover with their eyes alone what the 20-to-35-year-old carried to protect her in life and death: a Christian tattoo. Continue reading

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Shroud of Turin from time of Christ, scientists hypothesize

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ShroudOfTurin

Photo courtesy of The Telegraph.

Some have long suspected that the Shroud of Turin, which seems like an X-ray of a Christ-like figure, is a medieval forgery. After all, when Oxford University researchers tested a piece of the shroud in 1988 with radiocarbon dating, results showed it was  little more than 700 years old.

Not so fast, say Italian scientists, who have provided an interesting theory to explain the problem with radiocarbon dating and how the ghostly image appeared on the burial cloth. Continue reading

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Dromedary drama: Scientific dating of camel clashes with Bible

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“He loaded ten of Abraham’s camels with all kinds of expensive gifts,” we’re told in Genesis. Unfortunately, archaeologists at Tel Aviv University have used radiocarbon dating to reveal an anachronism: Camels were not domesticated in the southern Levant until 900 B.C. Continue reading

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