Second beheaded American was grandson of Holocaust survivors

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
American journalist Steven Sotloff (center in black helmet) talks to Libyan rebels  west of Misrata in 2011. jihadist video in which fellow US journalist James Foley was executed.   In the video the militant form the Islamic State (IS) threatens to kill Sotloff next if the US continues its aerial campaign against the insurgency.  (Photo by Etienne de Malglaive via Getty Images)

American journalist Steven Sotloff (center in black helmet) talks to Libyan rebels west of Misrata in 2011. Photo by Etienne de Malglaive via Getty Images)

How much suffering does one family have to endure?

Steven Sotloff, a freelance journalist who wrote for Time and Foreign Policy, didn’t “cower from danger, he flew right into it, intent on telling the stories he believed would shape history,” Danielle Berrin, a childhood friend, notes in her Hollywood Jew blog. Continue reading

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

On top of the world: A panorama from the new WTC

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

TimeTopOfAmericaPhotograph by Jonathan D. Woods and Michael Franz for Time magazine; stitching: Gavin D. Farrell; compositing: Meghan P. Farrell; color: Claudio Palmisano/10b

Acrophobics look away.

Time magazine has gone to the top of the steel-and-glass symbol of freedom — the 1,776-foot high 1 World Trade Center — to make an interactive 360-degree image.

“You can see the whole world up there,” says Jonathan D. Woods, Time’s senior editor for photography and interactive.

How did they do it?

“An eight-month process of design and construction resulted in a 13-ft.-long aluminum jib calibrated to adhere to the base of the beacon at the top of the tower’s 408-ft. spire,” according to Richard Lacayo in Time.  “To that rotating arm was attached a Canon 5D Mark II with a 100-mm lens. Over a five-hour span of orbital shooting on Sept. 28, 2013, the camera produced 567 pictures that were then stitched together digitally into a single massive—and zoomable—image of everything the eye can see in all directions.”

You can play with the panorama here.

Read Time’s article on The Top of America here.

Watch a video  of how they took the picture here.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail